CTVA US Music Variety - "The Bell Telephone Hour" (NBC) Season 10 (1967-68)

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Season 10 (NBC) (1967-68)
Episode Guide compiled by The Classic TV Archive
with contributions by: Rina Fox
references:
TV Guide / Library of Congress (telnet://locis.loc.gov)
Internet Movie Database (http://us.imdb.com)
UCLA Film and Television Archive

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NBC

10.01 [110] THE MANY FACES OF ROMEO AND JULIET
22-Sep-67
Executive producer Barry Wood
Producer Dan Lounsbery
Writer Lucille Kallen
Director Clark Jones
Conductor Donald Voorhees
Choreographer Lee Theodore
The Bell Telephone Orchestre
Announcer Mel Brandt
starring
actress Claire Bloom
actor Jason Robards
singer-dancer-actress Carol Lawrence
singer-dancer-actor Larry Kert
ballet dancers Erik Bruhn
and Carla Fracci
Opera singer Anna Moffo
and tenor Sandor Kenya.

Highlights:
Jason Robards and Claire Bloom perform scenes from "Romeo and Juliet" that serve as introductions to their counterparts in music and dance.
Erik Bruhn and Carla Fracci dance the pas de deux balcony scene from Prokofiev's ballet.
Soprano Anna Moffo and tenor Sandor Kenya perform the balcony scene from Gounod's "Romeo et Juliette".
In a recreation of their Broadway roles in "West Side Story," Larry Kert and Carol Lawrence sing "Maria" and "Tonight."

10.02 [111] ON THE ROAD WITH DUKE ELLINGTON
13-Oct-1967
Produced by Mike Jackson
Executive producer Robert Drew
Associate producer Harry Moses
Narrated by Don Morrow
with performances by
Duke Ellington
Johnny Hodges
and Mercer Ellington.

Highlights:
Duke Ellington at 68 full of vitality continues his vigorous schedule traveling thru the country from a concert of sacred music in Ohio, to a recording session in New York to a series of Midwestern one-night stands. He stops long enough to give his impressions of life, his own living legend and the futility of retirement.
Duke and the band are seen performing "Satin Doll", "Sophisticated Lady" and "Mood Indigo".
Between performances Duke composes a piece entitled "Salute to Morgan State" as he prepares to receive another honorary degree from Morgan State University.
Explores the music and personality of musician, Duke Ellington. The camera follows as he moves from town to town, from recording studios to hotels and concert halls, always concerned with reaching people with his art.
The program winds up with a performance of "Take the A Train".

*Note: This program reaired in 1974 as a memorial after his death on May 24, 1974.

10.03 [112] BENJAMIN BRITTEN AND HIS ALDEBURGH FESTIVAL
03-Nov-1967
With performances by
Benjamin Britten
guitarist Julian Bream
pianist Sviatoslav Richter
and The Vienna Boys' Choir.

Highlights:
Composer-conductor-pianist Benjamin Britten and an international group of world renonwned musical figures gather at the small British seacoast village for the annual festival.
The Vienna Boys' Choir performs "The Golden Vanity".
Julian Bream plays "Nocturne".
Russian pianist Sviatoslav Richter joins Britten in Mozart's "Sonata in D Major for Two Pianos".
Britten conducts the English Chamber Orchestra in "The Building of the House" and the vocalization of his "Spring Symphony" by Peter Pears, Heather Harper, The English Opera Company and the King's College Chapel Choir.

10.04 [113] THE VIRTUOSO TEACHER
24-Nov-1967
Producer Robert Drew
Hosted by Donald Voorhees
starring
Joseph Fuchs
Takako Nishizaki
Christiane Edinger
Yehudi Menuhin
Pinchas Zukerman
Kyung-Wha Chung
Serge Lucca
Donald Wylerstein
Joseph Szigeti
Kurt Weinhold

"The Virtuoso Teacher" presents a portrait of violinist and teacher Joseph Fuchs as he prepares two young students, Takako Nishizaki and Christiane Edinger, for their concert careers. The intense weeks of lessons, the anxieties, disappointments, and the hopes of the students and Fuchs are shown as they participate in music competitions. They compete in the Leventritt Music Competition in Carnegie Hall and no winners are declared. They practice for next year. They and other competitors, Pinchas Zukerman, Kyung-Wha Chung, Serge Lucca, and Donald Wylerstein, are seen performing. Nishizaki and Edinger advance to the semi-finals but are then eliminated. Fuchs talks about teaching and playing the violin.

Highlights:
Yehudi Menuhim performs Bach's Double Concerto.
Performances of Brahms' Violin Concerto to Saint-Saens' Rondo Capriccioso.

10.05 [114] CASALS AT MARLBORO
29-Dec-1967
Executive Producer Henry Jaffe
Producer Nathan Kroll
Writer Harold C. Schonberg
Narrator Fritz Weaver
with performances by
conductor Pablo Casals
pianist Rudolf Serkin
violinist Alexander Schneider
and Jaime Laredo.

Highlights:
Pablo Casals conducts the festival orchestra with Mozart's "Haffner" Symphony and the Marlboro Music Fesitval.
Rudolf Serkin performs "The Trout" piano quintet by Franz Schubert.
Alexander Schneider plays Brahms' Sextet in B flat.
Casals coaches a student cellist in Beethoven's A Major Sonata and playing Schubert's C Major Quintet.

10.06 [115] THE MAN WHO DANCES: EDWARD VILLELLA
08-Mar-1968
Producer Robert Drew
Choreographer George Balachine
Conductor Donald Voorhees
Narrator Don Morrow
with performances by
Edward Villella
and Patricia McBride.

Highlights:
Excerpts of ballet performances showing Villella and Patricia McBride dancing "Tarantella," "Jewels," and "Harlequinade," choreographed by George Balanchine.
Interview with Villella as he decides whether to dance at a sold-out performance of Balanchine's "Rubies" after suffering a collapse on stage during a matinee performance on November 19 attended by nearly three thousand people.
Scenes leading up to this incident follow, with Villella at home; working in the studio; preparing for guest appearances; performing one of his own works with Patricia McBride; giving a lecture and demonstration at his alma mater; working in class; rehearsing "Rubies"; performing "Glinkiana"; and relaxing backstage afterward.
On the evening after his collapse, Villella's wife, Janet, is shown trying to dissuade him from giving his third performance of the day. The program cuts to Villella's performance of "Rubies" that night.

10.07 [116] OPERA: TWO TO SIX
22-Mar-1968
Hosted by Donald Voorhees
With performances by
coloratura soprano Joan Sutherland
baritone Tito Gobbi
tenor Nicolai Gedda
bass Jerome Hines
mezzo-soprano Mildred Miller
tenor Charles Anthony
and soprano Phyllis Curtin.

Highlights:
Joan Sutherland and Tito Gobbi perform a section of Act 2 of Tosca.
Charles Gounod - Faust Selections.
Giuseppe Verdi - Rigoletto Selections.
Richard Wagner - Meistersinger von Nurnberg.
Gaetano Donizetti - Lucia de Lammermoor Selections.

10.08 [117] GOING TO BETHLEHEM
14Apr1968
With performances by
soprano Judith Raskin
and basso Cesare Siepi
and the Moravian Church Choir.

Highlights:
Opening scenes of smoke belching steel works and street scenes of a small Pennsylvania community.
The people come from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Sixty-eight years ago they instituted a Bach Music Festial which today draws people from all over the world.
Judith Raskin and Cesare Siepi with the town's Moravian Church Choir perform.

10.09 [118] JAZZ -- THE INTIMATE ART
26-Apr-1968
Producers Robert Drew & Mike Jackson
Hosted by Donald Voorhees
with performances by
Louis Armstrong
Dizzy Gillespie
Dave Brubeck
Charles Lloyd
Paul Desmond
Gene Wright
Charlie Parker
and James Moody.

This episode spotlights the divergent jazz styles of Louis Armstrong, Dizzy Gillespie, Dave Brubeck, and Charles Lloyd as they perform, rehearse and spend time at home. Armstrong talks about growing up in New Orleans and joining a band in Chicago and is seen at a recording session and performance. At the Jazz Workshop in San Francisco, Gillespie reveals his mercurial personality. As one of the founders of bop, he helped to introduce not only a new approach to jazz but also the bop vocabulary and way of dressing.

Continued: The pianist-conductor-composer Dave Brubeck is shown at the final concert of the Brubeck Quartet in December 1967 in Pittsburgh and at another performance at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Charles Lloyd, one of the jazz world's newest stars, puts into his music all of the personal rapport he feels with today's younger generation. At Reed College in Portland, Oregon, Lloyd and his Lloyd Quartet communicate with his youthful following with his music and words.

*TV newslisting: This is the last Bell Telephone Hour musical program of the season.

Note: Alex McNeil's "Total Television" lists an episode for June 14, 1968

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